School

  • Walking to and from school increased from less than 14 percent to more than 17 percent of all trips between 2007-08 and 2014.

  • Do you know a child who would benefit from the SC Department of Education Summer Food Service Program? Learn more about the program and find a location near you!

  • Walk to School Day event registration is free and open to individuals and organizations holding an October event in the United States.

  • Find ideas for healthy fundraisers and read about successes in schools from around the country.

  • Determine if your snack is a “Smart Snack” with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Smart Snacks Product Calculator!

  • A new website developed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio seeks to fight against Latino childhood obesity that leads to poor health and diabetes. Salud America!, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, created the website.

  • Get ready for your school’s International Walk to School Day event with the new Walk to School Day Toolkit and Walk At School Day Toolkit.

  • Joint-use agreements are a promising strategy for increasing moderate to vigorous physical activity among adults and children in under-resourced communities.

  • New study shows removing full-calorie sports drinks from schools should have little to no financial impact on schools (or the beverage industry).

  • Half of S.C. adolescents surveyed say they eat fruit less than once a day.

  • Programs that provide classroom physical activity breaks can increase physical activity, and improve on-task behavior as well as some measures of health. There are a variety of programs that can be used to help kids be active in as little as 10-15 minutes.

  • ChildObesity180 launched a new website to provide out-of-school-time organizations with hundreds of resources, toolkits and products to help them promote healthy habits.

  • USTA is seeking middle schools to pilot the Kids’ Tennis Club program model-fun, social, active programs with a focus on supervised and organized play.

  • Walking school buses are great ways to get parents involved in making their child’s walk to school or the bus stop safer and fun. Now there’s help with planning a Walking Bus Program.

  • Resources are available to help schools implement the updated nutrition standards for school lunches.

  • Make a good case for physical activity and physical education in schools with a free online video by SPARK.

  • Need creative ideas for meal planning, shopping, and food preparation? Or fun suggestions for active play? The USDA’s new handbook has tips sheets and other helpful information.

  • Looking for a new way to make the case for physical activity improvements in your community? Check out a new report called Designed to Move.

  • A new year often brings new resolve to eat healthy. Unfortunately, good intention can be sidetracked when mid-afternoon hunger leads to a trip to the vending machine and the only options are candy, chips, and sugary beverages.

  • The National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity released model standards for food and beverages sold in vending machines, in addition to model legislation.

  • The Biggest Loser Trainer Bob Harper and Yoga Expert Tara Stiles show kids and families how to incorporate physical activities into breaks.

  • Looking for some help planning your school menu? The Alliance for a Healthier Generation has many tools and resources to help you meet or exceed the new regulations.

  • Free Mini Playbook has games to help students be active and become better learners.

  • Comprehensive collection of resources present the best evidence available about a variety of school-based strategies for promoting physical activity.

  • Get guidance on everything you need about making your community walkable.

  • What Works for Health is a new online tool you can use to find tested, effective policies and programs to improve health in your community.

  • The Built Environment Assessment Training Institute has launched a free online course to learn how to assess the built environment for physical activity

  • Twitter, the much beloved social networking site, is set to take on disease outbreaks, after HHS officials announced the release of a new Web-based application tool available to public health officials.

  • CDC synthesized research and best practices related to promoting healthy eating and physical activity in schools, culminating in nine guidelines.

  • The Farm to Preschool Subcommittee of the National Farm to School network recently launched a website designed to showcase programs and resources from around the country.

  • Schools and communities now have the the tools needed to develop a Joint Use Agreement that will enable school playgorunds to stay open after hours. Playing Smart is free and full of great information and materials for those interested in developing a join use agreement.

  • The National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity (NANA) has released five new updated fact sheets on competitive foods in schools.

  • Joint Use Agreements: Creating Opportunities for Physical Activity examines the characteristics of joint use agreements that were in effect during the 2009-10 school year among a national sample of 157 public school districts.

  • Most people like to believe that their children are above average, and to be an above average fruit and vegetable consumer would not be hard. The average child in the U.S. eats no vegetables and the equivalent of less than 1/2 cup of fruit per day. The Center for Research in Nutrition and Health Disparities at the University of South Carolina released the January 2012 edition of Policy Brief highlighting a study on fruit and vegetable consumption at a local elementary school.

  • Fruit and vegetable costumes are available for loan to SC residents from the Bureau of Community Health and Chronic Disease Prevention. These costumes can be used for a variety of nutrition education activities and events such as supermarket tours, National Nutrition Month activities, cooking demonstrations, Walk to School events, and classroom nutrition education presentations.

  • The Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (C.L.A.S.S.) website uses two policy classification systems to score state-level codified laws for physical education (PE) and nutrition in schools. The scoring criteria for these systems are based on current public health research and national recommendations and standards for PE and nutrition in schools. Click here to […]

  • The Do All Children Have Places to Be Active? Disparities in Access to Physical Activity Environments in Racial and Ethnic Minority and Lower-Income Communities Research Synthesis examines the growing body of evidence indicating that racial and ethnic minority, and lower-income, communities do not provide as many built and social environmental supports for physical activity, and summarizes research on racial, ethnic and economic disparities in obesity and physical activity rates among children and adults.

  • The South Carolina Safe Routes to School Resource Center is proud to announce that the website is up and running! Visit www.scsaferoutes.org now!

    This website is full of FREE, downloadable resources that can be used to help launch and promote your Safe Routes to School Programs.

  • Move More…it’s in the Cards provides teachers with an easy to use resource for leading children in physical activity. Each card describes an activity that teachers can use to help children meet the daily recommended amount of structured physical activity. Use of this tool increases the quality and quantity of children’s movement and can reinforce concepts being taught in the classroom. The games and activities are intended for children ages 3-5, but may be modified for younger children.